Sudan

November 19, 2015

Gulwali Passarlay’s Journey as a Refugee from Afghanistan to the UK

By Aletha Adu On Wednesday 18 November, Gulwali Passarlay enlightened a packed audience at the Frontline Club into his journey as an unaccompanied child refugee from Afghanistan to the United Kingdom. Joined by former Afghanistan correspondent for the BBC David Loyn, and Nadene Ghouri who co-authored his book The Lightless Sky, Passarlay was keen to […]


April 17, 2015

We Were Rebels: Former Child Soldiers in South Sudan

By Ratha Lehall On Friday 10 April, the Frontline Club hosted a screening of We Were Rebels, which was followed by a Q&A with director Florian Schewe. The film focuses on the struggles of South Sudan, the word’s youngest country, following its independence and through the eyes of Agel, a former child soldier during the civil […]


Friday 10 April 2015, 7:00 PM

Preview Screening: We Were Rebels + Q&A

This screening will be followed by a Q&A with director Florian Schewe.
We Were Rebels tells the story of Agel, a former child soldier who returns to South Sudan to help build his country. The film accompanies him over a period of two years – from South Sudan gaining its independence in 2011 to the renewed outbreak of civil war in December 2013.


Wednesday 8 January 2014, 7:00 PM

First Wednesday: South Sudan – What does the future hold for the world’s youngest country?

Fighting continues as delegations from South Sudan’s warring factions meet for talks in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The country, which gained its independence in July 2011, has seen at least 1,000 killed and 180,000 displaced since mid-December.

We will be joined by a panel of experts, journalists and aid workers to give you an up-to-date picture of what is happening on the ground and an insight into the divisions and tensions that have caused the conflict.


Tuesday 2 July 2013, 7:00 PM

Gino Strada in conversation with Giles Duley: Reflections of a War Surgeon

Since Italian NGO Emergency was established in 1994 it has provided free, high quality health care to more than 5,200,000 victims of war, landmines and poverty. It is with great pleasure that we welcome its founder Gino Strada to the Frontline Club, he will be talking to photographer Giles Duley about his life and work as a war surgeon and founder of Emergency.


March 22, 2012

Nine years on is the UN still failing Darfur?

View event here. Download this episode View in iTunes By Nicky Armstrong  Last night’s event at the Frontline Club saw a heated debate between the expert panel and the audience on the UN’s presence in Darfur. Chaired by Patrick Smith, editor of Africa Confidential, the discussion bought up many of the tangled complexities surrounding the […]


March 21, 2012 7:00 PM

Nine years on is the UN still failing Darfur?

Since the start of the 2003 conflict in Darfur, questions have been raised about the role played by the United Nations and the viability of its mandate.

Join us at the Frontline Club to discuss the actions of the UN and whether they are still failing Darfur.


January 10, 2012

U.N Me Screening and Q&A with author Ami Horowitz

By: Ivana Davidovic When the United Nations was founded after World War II it embodied the world’s hopes for a more peaceful and just world. Since it’s noble founding, wars and human rights abuses have continued unabated, throwing a spotlight at the UN’s role in keeping the peace and building a fairer world for all. […]


September 21, 2011

ForesightNews world briefing: UN General Assembly’s General Debate

By Jasper Smith, senior international and security affairs reporter, ForesightNews USA Once a year, the world’s leaders descend on New York for the UN’s blue ribbon event, the cumbersomely-titled UN General Assembly’s General Debate. This year, the build-up has been dominated by the Palestinian Authority’s planned bid to become the 194th member of the UN, […]


July 13, 2011 7:00 PM

Focus on Sudan: What does independence mean for North and South?

Salva Kir is to lead South Sudan into independence on the 9 July after a landslide referendum earlier this year where 99% of the South voted to secede from the North. But with relations still tense over disputed border regions of Abyei and the surrounding area, what does the future hold for North and South alike?


July 12, 2011

South Sudan – what does the future hold for the newborn nation?

By Millie Cartwright The Republic of South Sudan was awash with celebrations this weekend as it became officially independent from the North following a landslide referendum in February this year, when 99 per cent of South Sudanese voted for independence. Juba, the new capital, was packed with dignitaries and officials to mark the new county’s […]


July 10, 2011

Welcome South Sudan

I thought it would be a nice idea to make my first entry on this blog a celebration of the birth of South Sudan. After years of neglect or reports of the horror of the war which raged on and off for close to fifty years, how wonderful to see the unbridled joy reported by […]


July 5, 2011

ForesightNews world briefing: Independence and violence in Sudan

By Nicole Hunt, international news reporter,  ForesightNews On Saturday, 9 July, over 30 African heads of state and diplomats from around the world will gather in Juba, the capital of Southern Sudan, to celebrate the independence of the world’s newest country. The secession from Sudan marks the culmination of the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement, signed to […]


April 22, 2010

World Politics Review: Disputes Threaten Chad-Sudan Peace Deal

Crashed Chadian helicopter. David Axe photo. by DAVID AXE On April 16, a Chadian helicopter with at least three people aboard crashed in Adre, a town abutting the border with Sudan in the desert region shared by the two countries. One person died in the crash, while two were injured. The incident was an unwelcome […]


July 18, 2009

The Tanks That Won’t Go Away

Well this is awkward, isn’t it? You may remember that last year Somali pirates captured a ship loaded with 33 T-72 tanks, which the Kenyan government went to great lengths to deny were destined for its friends in south Sudan (arming one side or the other being in breach of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, unless […]


July 11, 2009

Gambling for Sudan

I’m generally in favour of celebrities getting involved in awareness raising campaigns for Africa’s miserable assortment of wars. And, while destroying children’s toys for Darfur appeared to show a slight misunderstanding of the nature of kids’ playthings in this part of the world, I wasn’t going to get too pedantic about cultural disconnects and so […]


June 14, 2009

What’s the Point of Advocacy?

Signs of weariness among some of the campaigners who first brought Darfur to the world’s attention. After six years of advocacy, of campaigning for an end to the conflict, there’s a moment of soul-searching. Nick Kristof, columnist for the New York Times, wrote the first article that catapulted the crisis into public consciousness. Now he […]


June 2, 2009

Dodging Antonovs in Darfur

It wasn’t much more than a speck. A tiny, white fleck in the wide blue sky above us. Our 4×4 lurched to a halt as Yahia, the driver, peered through the 10 inches of windscreen scraped clean of the mud that camouflaged the rest of the vehicle. Then we were off again, lurching over the […]


May 25, 2009

Coffee on the Frontline

  Just returning from five days with rebels of the Justice and Equality Movement in Darfur. The trip was a chance to get under their skin and explore their programme for a chapter of my book (Saving Darfur: Everyone’s Favourite African War). I’ll be posting more about the trip in the days to come but […]


May 1, 2009

A Confession

OK, I’ve been found out. I don’t know how many people have died in Darfur. This was helpfully pointed out by Guy Gabriel on the Making Sense of Darfur blog… The use of these figures in the media is inconsistent; both individual journalists and newspapers themselves vary in the numbers they use. For example, a […]


April 25, 2009

A Confession

OK, I’ve been found out. I don’t know how many people have died in Darfur. This was helpfully pointed out by Guy Gabriel on the Making Sense of Darfur blog… The use of these figures in the media is inconsistent; both individual journalists and newspapers themselves vary in the numbers they use. For example, a […]


April 16, 2009

Live tonight: Joseph Kony and the Lord’s Resistance Army

Live Broadcast by Ustream.TVWe’ll be discussing whether it’s the end for Joseph Kony and the Lord’s Resistance Army at the Frontline Club tonight, 16 April, at 7pm GMT/11am PST. As usual, if you can’t make it to the Club in person, we’ll be streaming the event live on the Frontline Club Events page and on […]


March 16, 2009

Leaving Khartoum

This trip was a bit of a punt. We knew the ICC decision was coming, but no-one knew when. George Clooney and Nick Kristof took a gamble and were a week or so too early. Others in Nairobi left it too late and couldn’t get a visa in time. My advantage was that I came […]


March 4, 2009

Aid Workers Forced From Camps

Foreign aid workers have been ordered out of key locations across Darfur as the Sudanese Government flexes its muscles before a decision today by the International Criminal Court (ICC) on whether to charge President al-Bashir with war crimes. The six NGOs are: Oxfam, CHF, Solidarites, MSF-France, MSF-Holland, Care International. The locations are: Abu Shouk, Gereida, […]


March 3, 2009

Bracing for impact

Juba, the capital of the semi-autonomous region of South Sudan, is currently extremely tense, awaiting the reaction of national president Omar al-Bashir to tomorrow’s International Criminal Court decision on whether to issue an arrest warrant against him. Should the ICC go ahead with the indictment – for ten counts of war crimes, crimes against humanity […]


February 26, 2009

Lockdown in Darfur

  It’s business as usual, according to pretty much anyone you ask in Khartoum when the issue of next week’s International Criminal Court indictment of Omar al-Bashir comes up. No-one wants to give the Sudanese government an excuse to accuse diplomats or the international community of acting as judge and jury and finding Bashir. So […]


February 23, 2009

The Waiting is Over – Apart from the next 8 days that is…

Proving once again that mindless press speculation can serve a purpose, the International Criminal Court has been forced to put out a notice saying that it will issue a warrant for the arrest of annouce its decision on President Omar al-Bashir next Wednesday. It rather snootily notes… CONSIDERING that there have been numerous rumors over the […]


February 18, 2009

Waiting for the ICC

  Life in Khartoum is settling into a bit of a routine. Batter out a thousand words for my book first thing, then it’s a day of meetings, planning and checks as I prepare to head to Darfur. It’s always a tricky business. No-one ever knows when the travel permit will come through. Maybe four […]


February 17, 2009

Progress in Darfur Peace Talks

Good news emerging from Doha where members of the Justice and Equality Movement are poised to sign an agreement with the Sudanese government that could pave the way to peace talks on Darfur. The deal includes an agreement to end attacks on people living in aid camps and an exchange of prisoners. It is designed […]


February 16, 2009

Breakfast in Khartoum IV (Although I’m frankly not sure of the number)

Ozone is a quiet place these days. Ever since the US embassy in Khartoum warned its citizens to avoid places where expats tended to gather there have been fewer white faces here at the world’s best coffeeshop on a roundabout. Ozone is a particular target apparently. People are on tenterhooks waiting for the International Criminal […]