Chechnya

Wednesday March 20th 2019, 7:00 PM

The Queer Purges in Chechnya – CANCELLED

Join us for a panel to discuss the dangers for LGBT+ citizens in Russia – and why it’s been so hard to get the story out – and to look at the situation for refugees from Chechnya and around the world, who’ve had to flee their homes as a result of persecution for their gender or orientation.


Thursday 7 January 2016, 7:00 PM

UK Premiere: At Home in the World + Q&A

This screening will be followed by a Q&A with director Andreas Koefoed.
This remarkably intimate and touching documentary focuses on one Danish Red Cross school for refugees, where classrooms are filled with children from more than twelve countries. The students have had to learn Danish while adjusting to new surroundings and, in some cases, dealing with the traumas of conflict.


Friday 13 November 2015, 7:00 PM

Screening and Discussion: A World Without Words

For this unique event a selection of short documentaries by celebrated ethnographic filmmaker Vincent Moon will be screened in alternation with an informal discussion by the director of London’s Institute of Philosophy Dr Barry Smith. He will explore the neural correlates of meaning, music and language in the context of each film, to offer the audience an explanation of the role of language in subjective mental life.


June 15, 2015

Chechnya: A ‘Schizophrenic Land’

By Sara Monetta Twenty years have passed since the beginning of the first Chechen war. How has the country changed in this period and what happened to the many men and women who fought for independence? With this starting point, journalist and filmmaker Manon Loizeau revisited Chechnya, a country where she had previously lived and reported from during the […]


Friday 12 June 2015, 7:00 PM

Al Jazeera Preview Screening: Chechnya, War Without Trace + Q&A

This screening will be followed by a Q&A with director Manon Loizeau.
Award-winning journalist Manon Loizeau has spent the past 20 years covering the Chechen conflict. In Chechnya, War Without Trace she returns to the places she knew well, filming undercover, to examine the lasting effects of conflict with Russia.


April 15, 2014

Letters to Myself – thoughts on war 20 years on

by Sally Ashley-Cound Letters to Myself, which screened at the Frontline Club on Monday 14 April, follows Russian photographer Oleg Klimov as he returns to the places he documented during the disintegration of the Soviet Union in the 1990s and into the 2000s. The film combines Klimov‘s memories with the stories of the people he […]


February 16, 2009

Surviving a Kidnapping in Chechnya

In 1997, Camilla Carr and Jonathan James were kidnapped and held for fourteen months in Chechnya. Speaking neither Russian nor Chechen, armed with good intentions and a car full of toys, the two Britons had volunteered to help traumatised children in Grozny. They were soon kidnapped, and this book – The Sky is Always There: […]


December 19, 2007

One Soldier’s War in Chechnya

It was with some pleasurable anticipation that I awaited this book from the Frontline’s Books Editor. He wanted “a soldier to review a soldier’s book.” When it arrived, I did what I do with all books before starting to read it in earnest: examine the cover, look at the photos, check for maps. This volume […]


August 21, 2007

In Roddy Scott’s Memory

Roddy Scott was one of a rare breed of journalist adventurers – able to take physical hardship, utterly dedicated to finding stories about real people, and working throughout as a genuine freelance – the kind of person the Frontline club was set up to support. His picture is one of eight in the frame next […]


August 18, 2007

Chechnya – Russia’s “War on Terror”

When three planes smashed into the World Trade Centre and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001, few expected Chechnya to feel the impact. But 9/11 probably had the most far-reaching consequences for the Chechens since Stalin deported the entire population to Siberia in 1944. It also saved the career of Russian President Vladimir Putin, whose […]


November 3, 2006

Death of a critic

It was an early morning phone call that let me know of the attack. Issa, a friend in Chechnya, his usually steady voice betraying just a tremor of fear, said unknown gunmen had opened fire on the car he had sent to collect me.  Of the two men inside, one was badly wounded. He said […]